So I bought the porcelain doll that looked like my friend porphyrin-prince and have been investing time in making it resemble him more closely. This is with the intention of doing a transcontinental collaboration, which I am very excited about!

The doll’s name is Joshua. I have cut and fixed his hair, transplanted his head onto a more suitable body, and am in the process of creating clothes for him. The faux blouse is merely a placeholder, but the little shorts are the pattern I created and mocked up.

He now has a big bell jar to live in, so that he doesn’t get dusty or messed up.

Joshua has a number of props and things that I am picking up here and there, and at some point, he will be going on some fine adventures.

porcelain doll doll art works in progress

I picked up an old music box at work today.

benefits of working in a charity shop although customers nearly always beat me to the neat stuff music box otagiri

Cameras, part 2/???

Some of the old black-and-gold crowd. From left to right:

Kodak Eastman, Folding Pocket No.3A Mod C, circa 1912. Big beautiful bellows camera that took postcard-sized film, but which I am going to use 120 film in to make long panoramas.

ICA, Icarette (6x9), 1914. Awesome little bellows that accepts 120 sized film. One of my favorite ones.

Kodak Eastman, Vest Pocket Model A, 1912. One of the first truly pocket-sized cameras. With bellows. Takes 127, which isn’t made anymore, but which I have a bunch of long-expired rolls of. I also have a bunch of spools, so I am going to be doing some respooling.

(Top) Falcon Minicam Junior, 1930s-era bakelite toy camera. 127 film.

(Bottom) Agfa-Ansco, Cadet Box D6, 1935. Box camera, uses 116 film, which I have, but I will also be using 120. I bought this one myself, because I like box cameras and I didn’t inherit any.

(Top) Clix Miniature, 1930s-era bakelite toy camera. 127 film.

(Bottom) Acro-Flash, early 1950s bakelite toy camera. 127 film.

Cameras, part 2/???

Some of the old black-and-gold crowd. From left to right:

Kodak Eastman, Folding Pocket No.3A Mod C, circa 1912. Big beautiful bellows camera that took postcard-sized film, but which I am going to use 120 film in to make long panoramas.

ICA, Icarette (6x9), 1914. Awesome little bellows that accepts 120 sized film. One of my favorite ones.

Kodak Eastman, Vest Pocket Model A, 1912. One of the first truly pocket-sized cameras. With bellows. Takes 127, which isn’t made anymore, but which I have a bunch of long-expired rolls of. I also have a bunch of spools, so I am going to be doing some respooling.

(Top) Falcon Minicam Junior, 1930s-era bakelite toy camera. 127 film.

(Bottom) Agfa-Ansco, Cadet Box D6, 1935. Box camera, uses 116 film, which I have, but I will also be using 120. I bought this one myself, because I like box cameras and I didn’t inherit any.

(Top) Clix Miniature, 1930s-era bakelite toy camera. 127 film.

(Bottom) Acro-Flash, early 1950s bakelite toy camera. 127 film.

cameras antique film photography kodak bellows camera box camera bakelite toy camera black and gold agfa